Skip navigation

Tag Archives: American Goldfinch

Ozzie

“Ozzie” (American Goldfinch, Male, Summer Plumage) Nikon D300, 650mm (200-400mm w/1.7x teleconverter), F/6.7, 1/80s, ISO 640

Whenever I’m out shooting with any of my¬†larger lenses, I invariably end up photographing some of the birds as they make their way about the landscape, snacking on all the free food. Yes, it’s a pretty sweet deal for them. ūüôā¬†

Early this season, we added a thistle feeder with the hope of attracting the goldfinches we’d seen sporting about (those bright yellow feathers are hard to miss!)¬†It took awhile, but I’m happy¬†to report that several families¬†visit the feeder daily and they have gotten used to us so¬†they are no longer¬†spooked¬†by the camera.¬†With their stunning golden plumage, they are not only delightful to watch but¬†always make for a nice subject.¬†

Harriet

“Harriet” (American Goldfinch, Female, Summer Plumage) Nikon D300, 650mm (200-400m w/1.8x teleconverter), F/6.7, 1/50s, ISO 640

I typically prefer to capture birds in a more natural setting (e.g., sitting on a branch or tucked into the trees), but sometimes, you take what you can get. ūüôā

Since they habitually land on the curved part of the bracket that holds the feeder before making their way to an open perch, I naturally aimed my camera there. As usual, first to arrive was the male to scope out the situation before calling to the missus, who shortly followed suit. 

Recently, the black-capped chickadees discovered the wonders of the thistle feeder and have been giving the finches a run for their money! Fortunately, all seem to get along. It simply means the feeder gets emptied quicker!

Above the Curve

“Above the Curve” (Black-capped Chickadee) Nikon D300, 650mm (200-400mm w/1.7x teleconverter), F/6.7, 1/50s, ISO 640

This little chickadee seemed to be egging me on and with so much personality, I couldn’t resist!

Mr. Red

“Mr. Red” (Northern Cardinal, Male) Nikon D300, 650mm (200-400mm w/1.7x teleconverter), F/6.7, 1/200s, ISO

I didn’t even realize I had actually captured one shot of the male cardinal until I looked through the media card! Although I do¬†like the natural setting here, it still isn’t quite THE image I’ve been striving for.¬†

In any event, the cardinal¬†does seem rather pleased with himself, doesn’t he? I think he enjoys this game of tease and fly! And, I suppose, a part of me does as well because, what is the fun of the capture without the thrill of the chase? ūüôā

Advertisements

I spy

with my big lens

"Spot of Gold" (American Goldfinch, Male, Spinus tristis) Nikon D300, 1000mm (600mm w/1.7x teleconverter), F/6.7, 1/200, +0.7EV, ISO 400

a cute golden finch

and, perphaps, a new friend? ūüôā

On Monday night, we purchased a thistle feeder and some thistle seed with the sole purpose of attracting American Goldfinches to feed in our yard. (My goal is to create a photographic catalog of the local wildlife so each year I try to learn a bit more about the different birds and critters found in our area). 

Spring Golden Girl

“Spring Golden Girl” (American Goldfinch, Female in Winter Plumage) Nikon D300, 1000mm (600mm w/1.7x teleconverter), F/6.7, 1/800s, ISO 1250

I (impatiently) spent most of the day waiting¬†for a pair of goldfinches still sporting their winter plumage to approach the¬†feeder. Cautious by nature,¬†the two spent what seemed like an eternity hanging¬†out in the high branches of trees¬†just passed our yard’s fence line. When they¬†finally¬†felt confident enough to come closer, I had¬†(sadly) moved on¬†so¬†I was¬†caught off-guard and not positioned in the¬†very best location. (It’s not easy being a wildlife photog!)¬†

Spring Golden Boy

“Spring Golden Boy” (American Goldfinch, Male in Winter Plumage) Nikon D300, 1000mm (600mm w/1.7x teleconverter), F/6.7, 1/320s, ISO 640

Even so, I was glad to snap these images which¬†will be added to the catalog. The couple didn’t stay long but at least now they are aware of this excellent new food¬†source. I’m confident they will be back and can’t wait to capture them¬†when they are displaying their full-on goldfinch colors! ūüôā

A goal of mine is to photograph all the wild birds in the yard.

Easier said than done.

Some birds, like the sparrows and wrens, don’t seem to¬†mind being photographed. Others,¬†such as cardinals, orioles and goldfinches (aka,¬†the “pretty” birds), are rather shy for the camera. They require¬†research¬†and strategic¬†planning. A little luck doesn’t hurt either. ūüėČ

Like clockwork, every afternoon¬†the goldfinches visit our sunflower birdbath. I’ve already tried on several occaisions¬†to get a good shot; however,¬†none have been successful. It was time¬†to give it another go.

The first to arrive was an adult male with his bright yellow plumage and black stripes. He¬†was instantly startled by the¬†sound of the shutter, so I only got one (poor) shot off before he flew away. Next to visit was an adult¬†black-capped chickadee, who also didn’t like the camera and retreated quickly. Damn. Was this how the day was going to go?

Nope. ūüôā

Less than a minute later, a juvenile goldfinch arrived! How lucky! The juvies aren’t yet experienced enough to be so easily spooked by the camera, so I was able to get off a few shots.

"Earning My Stripes" (American Goldfinch, Juvenile) Nikon D300, 550mm (200-400mm w/1.4x teleconverter), F/5.6, 1/50s, -0.3EV, ISO 640

"Earning My Stripes" (American Goldfinch, Juvenile) Nikon D300, 550mm (200-400mm w/1.4x teleconverter), F/5.6, 1/50s, -0.3EV, ISO 640

This is most likely a juvenile male, but one can never be sure at this age.

Tell your dad, I’ll be ready for him next time! ūüôā

%d bloggers like this: