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Tag Archives: Motion Blur

“Primary Workout” (Pro-Form Elliptical Machine) Nikon D300, 18mm, F/4, 1/13s, ISO 200, Nik Silver Efex Pro ‘Pinhole’ B&W Filter w/Selective Toning

Nothin’ like a trip to the doctor to get one motivated back into an exercise routine…

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While I was busy photographing the front of the WDW steam-powered train, Jim captured this amazing panning shot of the rear coach!

“Into the Misty” (WDW Steam-Powered Train, Rear Coach, Disney’s Magic Kingdom) Nikon D700, 60mm, F/22, 1/10s, -2.0EV, ISO 100, Silver Efex Pro ‘Antique Plate II’ Filter

Nik’s Silver Efex Pro ‘Antique Plate II’ filter was applied in post to enhance the train’s, ahem, magical quality! 🙂

It is no secret Walt Disney had a love affair with trains, which is why there are four, meticulously restored, antique steam-powered trains encircling the Magic Kingdom park at Walt Disney World. Well, actually, only two trains are typically on the track at one time, but there are four trains total: #1 – Walter E. Disney; #2 – Lilly Belle; #3 – Roger E. Broggie; #4 – Roy O. Disney.

“Full Steam Ahead!” (The ‘Walter E. Disney’ Steam-Powered Engine, Disney’s Magic Kingdom) Nikon D300, 38mm, F/29, 1/6s, +0.3EV, ISO 100

We went to the Magic Kingdom this day specifically to photograph the trains. Of course, we first had to take a ride to get into the spirit of things! 🙂  

Although there are three stops on the circuit (Main Street, U.S.A., Frontierland and Mickey’s Toontown Fair), Toontown is the only stop where you can easily get to a site in front of the train when it is at the station (the pathway between Toontown and Tomorrowland is an excellent shooting spot and is usually void of crowds!) Another plus? If necessary, the ‘tender’ is topped off with water at the Toontown station which makes for maximum steam production upon leaving. (Note: Some conductors are more accommodating than others with the amount of steam produced when they see photogs out on the route).  

A train arrives at the station approximately every 5-8 minutes and we spent about an hour trying out different shooting angles, compositions and techniques. 

I was so hoping to get a decent panning shot and, phew, I did! 🙂

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