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This is our second day of needed rainfall and as the ground squished under my shoes, I made my way around the garden performing the usual morning tasks of filling the feeders and checking on all the plants.  

No watering can required. 🙂  

A green lacewing fluttered by me, struggling to fly in the gusting winds, landing ultimately on the wooden trellis at the grey shed. With their delicate transparent wings, a bright spring-green torso, reddish face and large eyes, lacewings are not only quite the interesting-looking insect but also a welcome friend in my garden since their larvae devour a variety of pests! As I’ve yet to photograph one, I went back inside to grab my camera but, unfortunately, by the time I returned, the lacewing had fled the scene. Shoot! 

Well, now that I had my camera, I traipsed around the sodden landscape seeking out another worthy subject. Hmmmm, what will it be?

"Belle" (Clematis viticella 'Betty Corning') Nikon D300, 105mm F/2.8G Macro, F/5.6, 1/160s, -1.7EV, ISO 1000, Silver Efex Pro Filter w/Selective Toning

A solitary Clematis viticella blossom drenched with raindrops was just begging to be noticed! I love the violet color, bell shape and those delicate, frilly edges. Surprisingly, not much was done in post except for some selective color removal along with dodging to highlight the bloom’s texture and edge details.  

So, as much as I would have liked a go at the lacewing, I’m inclined to think this was the shot that was meant to be. 🙂  

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One thing this Project 365 of mine has taught me is to look beyond the obvious and see the potential in subjects that, in the past, I would have promptly dismissed. 

For example, spring cankerworms have certainly done their fair share of damage this season, which is a source of aggravation for any gardener. However, as an ‘enlightened photographer’ ;-), I am now able to view them from a completely different perspective. 

"Inch By Inch" (Spring Cankerworm aka Inchworm) Nikon D300, 105mm, F/8, 1/250s, -0.3EV, ISO 400, Built-in Rear Curtain Flash, -2.0EV, Silver Efex Pro 'Split Toning' Filter

Plus, with my project finish only one day away, they are also very timely! 😀

“L’il Kitty” (Snowshoe Siamese) Nikon D300, 1000mm (600mm w/1.7x teleconverter), F/6.7, 1/160s, +0.7EV, ISO 400, Silver Efex Pro B/W Filter

My sister, Lori, has been nagging asking me for quite some time to post photos of my beautiful Snowshoe Siamese cat, Cleo. 😉

It’s not that I haven’t tried to get decent shots of my little girl; it’s more that Cleo isn’t all that, shall we say, accommodating?? If she even suspects that I’m taking her picture, I instantly get the ‘look’. So, I have to resort to using my long lens and catch her completely unawares. 

I was going to save these for Lori’s birthday near the end of the month, but what the heck, Sis – here’s your birthday gift a bit early! 🙂 

The post actually does double duty today. With hubby travelling for business, I know he is missing his furry baby girl back at home, so these will certainly make him smile. 

“Blue-eyed Girl” (Snowshoe Siamese) Nikon D300, 1000mm (600mm w/1.7x teleconverter), F/6.7, 1/100s, +0.3EV, ISO 400

Now, as for me, while I am missing seeing his baby blues, I can look at Cleo’s and think of him. 

Awwwwww.

Still adding to my catalog of local birds and happy to report a fine capture of a White-Throated Sparrow! 🙂 I’d been following this species for quite some time and finally all the elements (composition, lighting, subject) came together.

"Looking Back" (White-Throated Sparrow, Adult White-Striped, Zonotrichia albicollis) Nikon D300, 1000mm (600mm w/1.7x teleconverter), F/6.7, 1/60s, ISO 640, Selective Silver Efex Pro Sepia Toning

“Looking Back” (White-Throated Sparrow, Adult White-Striped, Zonotrichia albicollis) Nikon D300, 1000mm (600mm w/1.7x teleconverter), F/6.7, 1/60s, ISO 640, Selective Silver Efex Pro Sepia Toning

The males and females are identical so we shall never know which sex is shown here, but no matter. You can choose whatever one works for you. 😉 

I chose to apply selective toning (once again) for this image but this time in sepia since it nicely supports the bird’s natural coloration. 

Now where’s that male Cardinal…?!!

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