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Tag Archives: Striped

Very often, we will get asked if we have photos of a specific flower variety. Morning Glories are a pretty common request and until now, I hadn’t had any. I don’t grow morning glories because I once made the mistake of sowing some seeds and it took years to get rid of the invasive vines!

Good thing others grow them for me. ūüôā

"Tie Dye" (Tall Morning Glory 'President Tyler) Nikon D300, 105mm, F/5, 1/500s, -0.7EV, ISO 640

"Tie Dye" (Tall Morning Glory 'President Tyler) Nikon D300, 105mm, F/5, 1/500s, -0.7EV, ISO 640

I tried once before to capture this beauty but went too late on a warm day and the flowers were all closed up! I suppose they don’t call them Morning Glories for nothing! ūüôā

"Stained Glass" (Clematis 'Venosa violacea'), Nikon D300, 105mm, F/5, 1/200s, -1.0EV, ISO 400, SB800 w/Gary Fong Lightsphere Cloud, -1.0EV

"Stained Glass" (Clematis viticella 'Venosa violacea' aka Stargazer Clematis), Nikon D300, 105mm, F/5, 1/200s, -1.0EV, ISO 400, SB800 w/Gary Fong Lightsphere Cloud, -1.0EV

I didn’t think I’d see my Stargazer¬†Clematis bloom this year since the vines, which typically¬†flower in summer, were cut at the base by a critter in early June. Nothing more disappointing than seeing a thriving plant, covered in buds, suddenly wilt and die!

But knowing clematis is resilient, I made a clean cut below the chewed area and removed all the dying material. And then, I waited.

And waited. And waited.

When I noticed the two buds mid-September, I¬†prayed the weather would hold out long enough for them to bloom. We’ve had some unseasonally cold temps, followed by unseasonably hot temps, so it could go either way.

This week, the buds opened! Yay! ūüôā

“Bending their necks south, the daylilies gossip in the sunlight.”
~ Maureen Morehead, 1998

Saturday Lily

“Saturday Lily” (Tawny Daylily, Hemerocallis fulva) Nikon D300, 340mm, F/13, 1/50s, -0.3EV, ISO 640

Seen each July along dusty roadsides and in just about everyone’s garden, tawny daylilies shoot like fireworks out of the ground, exploding in brilliant, orange color. And just like fireworks, their life is brief – each bloom lasting a single day.

Common? Yes. Worth photographing? Absolutely.

The blossoms of¬†‘Sir Robert’ azalea demand respect. Oversized buds open to extraordinarily large and showy (and sometimes, even striped)¬†flowers¬†ranging in colors¬†from blush pink¬†to deep rose – all on the same plant!¬†

Pink-A-Boo!

“Pink-A-Boo!” (Robin Hill Hybrid Azalea ‘Sir Robert’) Nikon D300, 400mm, F/8, 1/200s, -0.7EV, ISO 400

Although many blossoms were damaged by the rain,¬†this one flower tucked waaaaay¬†underneath was intact. I actually¬†didn’t think it was going to be a successful capture (I only took two shots), but I really ended up¬†liking this sort of¬†‘bug’s eye’ view.

All that is needed is the hushed voice of an Australian¬†narrator saying, “So, here we are…deep¬†in the thicket…searching¬†for the elusive ‘Sir Robert’¬†azalea…and, crikey! There he is!” ūüėÄ

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